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Graduate Course Information

 

Spring 2014 WGST courses that can be used to satisfy the core requirements for the Gender Studies Graduate Certificate:

  • WGST 510-01 Feminist Theory – Emily Bent Mondays 5:30 – 8:20 pm This course explores the diverse ways that feminist theorists conceptualize gender in society, systems of inequality and the category of “woman” itself. Students will gain an understanding of evolving ideas and debates in feminist theory, relate those to feminist practice, and develop their own theoretical and analytical writing abilities. The course will address the social construction of gender, the relation between feminist theory and activism, and how feminists have responded to issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality in contemporary feminist thinking, as well as in classic feminist texts.

Spring 2014 English Graduate Courses that can be used to satisfy the elective requirements for the Gender Studies Graduate Certificate:

  • ENGL 505 Contemporary Literary Theory & Methods – Glenn Steinberg – Thursday  5:00  – 7:30 pm
 An introduction to the scholarly methods necessary for graduate work in literature and to the study of theoretical frameworks important to contemporary literary criticism, including formalism, structuralism, Marxism, deconstruction, feminism, post-colonial studies, cultural studies, new historicism, and psychoanalysis. The course exposes students to the primary texts from which those theoretical frameworks are derived and requires students to critique and construct applications of those theories to specific literary texts.
  • ENGL 614 Milton and the Seventeenth Century: “Witchy Women and Sexy Jesus” – Jean Graham-Tuesday  5:00-7 :30pm
 An examination of Milton’s poetry in the context of the literature and culture of early modern Britain. This semester we will focus on witches and monstrous women (comparing Milton with Spenser, with Homer, and with selected drama, including Shakespeare and The Witch of Edmonton); “noble savages” and ignoble imperialists (comparing Milton with two texts by Aphra Behn and with The Tempest); and homoerotics (comparing Milton with the “closet devotions” of John Donne and Thomas Traherne). Other themes include racism, rape, murder, and nationalism; the critical approaches stressed will be feminist and gender studies and postcolonial theory, with some attention to ecocriticism.  See syllabus at:  http://graham.intrasun.tcnj.edu/ENGL614spring2014.htm

Summer 2014 English Graduate courses that can be used to satisfy the elective requirements for the Gender Studies Graduate Certificate:

  • ENGL 670: “The Witch in Literature”  Summer 2014 Maymester (May 12 – 30, 2014) Trip to Salem: May 19-22, 2014

The witch has been a Peabody Essex Museum figure in literary history since the beginning of time. Who is she, and what does she embody? Who creates her, and to what end?
This course will explore the socio-historical constructions of this figure and trace her through a wide spectrum of literary texts, including legal and historical treatises, fairy tales, short stories, drama, film, children’s literature, poetry and even cartoons. In addition to the Maymester course, students will have the enhanced learning opportunity of traveling to Salem, Massachusetts for 4 days, where they will conduct archival research of the 1692 witch hunt at the Peabody Essex Museum (in addition to visiting many museums and living history programs). Through in-depth and on-site study of witch hunts and literary recreations of this figure, students will analyze the cultures which have persisted in creating, recreating and reviving this timeless, powerful and equally feared character throughout the ages.

 

  • ENGL 670-01 Studies in Literature: “Inappropriate Others: Transnational Fiction by Women Writers” – Janet Gray
    - Session B
    “I am like you”/”I am different”: In the words of Trinh T. Minh-Ha, contemporary transnational women writers are “inappropriate others” whose work challenges the opposition between cultural insider and outsider, same and other. This course will explore the politics of gender, culture, and nation in recent novels from Asia, Latin America, Africa, and the Middle East, drawing on postcolonial and transnational feminist thought for our critical base.

FALL  2014 WGST courses that can be used to satisfy the core requirements for the Gender Studies Graduate Certificate:

  • WGST 520 Gender Equity in the ClassroomEmily Meixner – Thursday 5:00 – 7:30 pm This graduate seminar examines theoretical writings on feminist pedagogy and
    also addresses practical issues related to teaching Women’s and Gender Studies.  Participants will  develop familiarity with  feminist pedagogies and their significance for the field of Women’s and Gender Studies; interpret their own educational experiences within the context of feminist reflections on education; formulate their own philosophies
    of education; and develop and test pedagogical strategies for developing critical consciousness about social inequalities.

Fall 2014 English Graduate Courses that can be used to satisfy the elective requirements for the Gender Studies Graduate Certificate:

  • ENGL 505 Contemporary Literary Theory and Methods – Felicia Steele – Monday, 5:00pm – 7:30pm

An introduction to the scholarly methods necessary for graduate work in literature and to the study of theoretical frameworks important to contemporary literary criticism, including formalism, structuralism, Marxism, deconstruction, feminism, post-colonial studies, cultural studies, new historicism, and psychoanalysis. The course exposes students to the primary texts from which those theoretical frameworks are derived and requires students to critique and construct applications of those theories to specific literary texts.

  • ENGL 640 Seminar in Romantic Literature – Harriet Hustis – Tuesday, 5:00pm – 7:30pm

This course is designed to offer an in-depth investigation of the literary phenomenon which has come to be known as “Romanticism”: in particular, we will be exploring this literary and historical period as a site of ongoing cultural conflict and negotiation between “old” and “new,” “nature” and “nurture,” “man” and “woman,” “poetry” and “prose.”  In addition, we will explore both how “the Romantics” defined themselves and how they were subsequently defined in retrospect, by contemporaries and by critics.  We will examine such questions as why, until recently, scholarship on the Romantic period was limited to studies of the figures of William Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Percy Shelley and Keats, and how feminist criticism, with its revalorisation of the work of Hemans, Landon, Wollstonecraft, Dorothy Wordsworth and Mary Shelley, has both problematized and reinvigorated previous definitions of “Romanticism.”  We will also analyze the kinds of literary imports and exports which influenced Romanticism: how did the literature and culture of Germany and France (and, in particular, the French Revolution and subsequent Terror) shape the writing of this period, and how and why was the phenomenon of Romanticism transplanted to the newly emerging United States?

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